Rudd rejoins cabinet, says constituents will be her ‘first priority’

Amber Rudd says she is ‘honoured’ to take on the role of Secretary of State for Work and Pensions.

It was announced this afternoon that the Hastings MP’s time in the political wilderness was over when Downing Street confirmed that she was returning to the cabinet replacing Esther McVey who stood down from the position yesterday.. Ms Rudd resigned as Home Secretary in April.

Chief Secretary to the Treasury Liz Truss was one of the first to welcome her back to cabinet when she tweeted, “great to have @AmberRuddHR back at the Cabinet table.” Former Chancellor George Osbourne also welcomed her return to cabinet saying he was a “big fan.”

Speaking on her new position, Ms Rudd said: “I am honoured to have been offered the opportunity to serve in Government as the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions.

“Representing Hastings and Rye has given me the experience of witnessing what works well and what does not. That experience will help me make changes where needed. The people of Hastings and Rye will always be my first priority.

She added: “Having a welfare system that supports the most vulnerable, giving them the opportunity to build themselves up and progress in their lives is at the heart of what this Government is committed to.

“The Department for Work and Pensions provides support to around 20 million individuals, helping to achieve record employment, providing greater support for families, and getting almost ten million people saving towards a secure retirement through Automatic Enrolment.

“It’s a great honour to be joining the Ministerial team to help deliver on major priorities for the department and Government as a whole. I look forward to the challenges ahead.”

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